Do You Really Need a Biopsy to Diagnose Celiac Disease

Celiac disease is traditionally diagnosed with a positive biopsy of the small intestine. The biopsy will demonstrate damage to the intestine known as villous atrophy. Villi are small finger-like extensions of the lining of the intestine that are visible only under the microscope. People with celiac disease and other conditions will show a marked reduction Read more…

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Recommended Fiber Intake

The USDA recommends that adults take in a minimum of 25 to 35 grams of fiber daily, and soluble fiber should account for one-third to one-half of the total. As many as 60 grams of fiber per day is required for optimal health. If you eat at least five servings of fruits and vegetables as Read more…

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Successful Gluten-Free Dining Out

Going out to enjoy a nice meal at a restaurant can be quite a challenge if you happen to be living a gluten-free lifestyle. If you are gluten-free you no doubt have experienced some difficulty in having a positive restaurant experience. But have no fear, because there are ways to make sure that your gluten-free Read more…

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More About Food Allergies: IgE and IgG

The immune system functions like a sentinel standing guard against foreign invaders. In the case of an allergy, the invaders are called allergens. The primary weapon that it uses against invaders is the production of antibodies. The antibodies cause reactions that result in the offending allergens being removed from the body. In many people, foods Read more…

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Get Your Lab Results!

Have you ever gone to the doctor and had blood taken for laboratory tests? Do you always get your lab results? Do you even hear back at all from the doctor? All too often in medicine people have lab tests run and then never learn the outcome of those tests. It’s tempting to assume that Read more…

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…That Tricky Celiac Disease

Hi G-Free Foodies, I’d like to introduce you to the newest member of the Gluten Free Advocates & Experts crew, Andrew Steingrube! Andrew has a Master’s Degree in Nutritional Science and a passion for healthy eating & helping people live well. He’s full of information & looking forward to helping us all live deliciously Gluten Read more…

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WSJ.com: Deciphering the Ailments Tied to Gluten

Very interesting article on understanding the ailments tied to gluten, from theblogs at the Wall Street Journal. Researchers are making slow progress in understanding the numerous ailments that a growing number of people suffer after eating foods with gluten, a protein found in wheat. As the Health Journal column reports, a group of 15 experts Read more…

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I Can't Possibly Have a Food Allergy

This is a comment frequently spoken (or thought) by patients and non-patients alike. You probably assume that it would be obvious if you had a food allergy. Or you may not have had symptoms until more recently, and you’ve been eating the same kinds of foods all of your life. So how can you possibly Read more…

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Hotels cater to special diets; gluten-free food now on menus

It’s no longer enough for hotels to offer vegetarian food options. Now their menus are going gluten-free, dairy-free and macrobiotic to cater to Americans’ diets. For example: •Kimpton’s Hotel Palomar San Francisco this month began offering gluten-free items, such as Glutino pretzel twists, in its minibars. Kimpton’s Hotel Monaco in Portland, Ore., also has gluten-free Read more…

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Gluten-free Fat Tuesday

Before moving down to the South I had no experience celebrating Mardi Gras.  I had to do a little research to find out that Mardi Gras is French for Fat Tuesday.  As with many holidays, this celebration involves eating rich, fatty foods (not allowed during Lent), so research for gluten-free options for the most well-known Read more…

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Understanding and Defining Celiac Disease

What is celiac disease? You may have never heard of celiac disease, but it is actually a fairly common problem. In fact, 1 out of every 133 people has it. That is over 2 million people in this country. It is really more of an allergy than a disease, although it is typically called an Read more…

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